Josh Vollmer Reviews Fable III

Posted on 26, Nov

Fable III is all about revolution. On our third trip to the land of Albion, we see a world that is changing. An industrial revolution has taken place, and the signs are evident from Brightwall to Bowerstone. There’s another revolution bubbling under the surface of the new cobblestones and behind those brick walls- a revolution against a tyrant king by an oppressed people and led by you, the king’s brother.

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Every so often, a game comes along that kicks your ass on normal, and you have to pick the dreaded “easy” choice and suck in your pride, because playing the first stage of a game and dying right away can only be fun for so long. Sin and Punishment is not one of those games. Sin and Punishment kicks your ass on “normal,” and then when you switch to “easy,” it kicks your ass again. It recalls the days of the original NES, when the games actually seemed angry at you for having the temerity to play them, and did everything they could to encourage you to stop.

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Castlevania:Lords of Shadow owes a huge debt to its third person action game ancestry. The game starts off slow, and I would have to forgive someone an hour into it if they thought they were playing Kratos goes to Dante’s Inferno to look for a Heavenly Sword. However, as I progressed through the epic two-disc-long storyline, I realized this game does have some legs of its own. Castlevania may wear its influences on its sleeve, but the tidbits MercurySteam and Kojima Productions borrow from other franchises are done well-and in some cases, even improved upon.

Take some of the battle sequences. The game incorporates quick time events similar to those you may have seen in, oh, any action game from the past decade. I’m not usually a fan of these because I’m so busy looking out for which button to press that I don’t actually get to see the big cinematic fight in the background. Castlevania:LoS makes use of a visual cue that requires a well timed button press but doesn’t specify a specific button. Just mashing any button you want at the right time makes it quite a bit easier to see the action.

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Adam “Kane” Marcus and James Seth Lynch have returned for a sequel that is in many ways superior to its predecessor. The former inmates have reunited after parting ways from their last ordeal together, simply so that they can complete a job that will secure them both well into retirement. For those of you unfamiliar with the events of Kane and Lynch: Dead Men, it’ll be reassuring to know that there is no need to play the original game to enjoy the realistic third-person shooter that is Kane and Lynch 2: Dog Days.

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